The Nepalese Festival Of Lights

The Nepalese Festival Of Lights

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Every single dog owner knows that meeting your dog is love at first sight. Those of you without these awesome companions:

Imagine coming home after a particularly long day, being drained both emotionally and physically, knowing that in your irritated state this morning, you might have aggravated one or more of the people you live with (yikes). Instead of (or perhaps in between) these angry people awaiting your arrival, you are met by an overjoyed furry face, a wagging tail, eyes glinting with adoration, and blissful unspoken forgiveness for whatever spur of the moment emotional crime you might have committed.

Dogs have been proven therapeutic for your emotional health, but what makes them so special is their ability to sense when you have emotional distress, and attempt (very persistently) to make you feel better.

Ever wonder why your dog does their super adorable “head tilt”? This action has actually been proven that they are trying to understand your emotions and empathise with you.

 

Via pinterest.com.

 

How cool is that?

Now that we have established that one should rather become a single old dog lady if they remain unmarried, Nepal has the best and most beautiful festival, and honouring their pets gets its own day!

Nepal’s Tihar festival is a Hindu tradition, which is a five-day long festival that is also called the Festival of Lights, as during this time Diyas are lit inside and outside of houses to illuminate the night. The dates of this amazing festival shifts alongside the new moon day of Kartika, and the celebrations begin two days before, and end two days after.

 

VIA cnn

Via CNN.

 

This festival shows reverence to not only humans and gods, but also animals such as crows, cows and especially dogs because they maintain an intense relationship with humans.

 

Via fabweb.com.

 

The second day is called Kukur Tihar or Kichā Pujā (worship of the dogs). Dogs are believed to be the messengers of the lord Yamaraj (god of death). People offer garlands, tika, and delicious food to show that they acknowledge the cherished relationship between dogs and humans.

 

Via fabweb.com.

 

VIA fabweb.com

Via fabweb.com.

 

I don’t know about you, but I think that this amazing festival is definitely restoring my faith in humanity.

 

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